Paleonews

Il blog dedicato ai Paleontologi !!!!

2009-09-03 – Australia: 3 nuovi dinosauri (Australia, 3 new dinosaurs)

Fossili di 3 grandi dinosauri scoperti in Australia

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Fossili di tre nuove specie di dinosauri sono stati scoperti in Australia, di cui quello di un carnivoro più grande del Velociraptor dei film di Jurassic Park, lasciando intendere che l’Australia potrebbe avere un passato preistorico più complesso di quanto si pensi.

I tre fossili, due di erbivori e uno di un carnivoro — i primi resti di grandi dinosauri rinvenuti dal 1981 — sono stati trovati nel Queensland e risalgono al Cretaceo, 98 milioni di anni fa.

“Questa scoperta ci fa conoscere non solo due affascinanti giganti dal collo lungo del continente australiano antico, ma anche il nostro primo grande predatore” ha detto oggi il paleontologo John Long, del Museo Victoria.

Il paleontologo Ben Kear dell’Università La Trobe di Melbourne ha detto che la scoperta apre la strada a nuovi studi sui dinosauri australiani e il loro habitat.

“L’Australia è una delle grandi risorse poco sfruttate per la comprensione della vita nel periodo dei dinosauri”, ha detto Kear. “Questo … farà sicuramente crescere l’interesse nelle finora incomplete ma rilevanti scoperte in questo continente”.

fonte:

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Triple Fossil Find Puts Australia Back On The Dinosaur Map

ScienceDaily (July 3, 2009) — Scientists have discovered three new species of Australian dinosaur discovered in a prehistoric billabong in Western Queensland.

Artistic representations of the three new Australian dinosaur taxa: Australovenator (top); Wintonotitan (middle); Diamantinasaurus (bottom). (Credit: Artwork by: T. Tischler, Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum of Natural History / Scott A. Hocknull, Matt A. White, Travis R. Tischler, Alex G. Cook, Naomi D. Calleja, Trish Sloan, David A. Elliott. New Mid-Cretaceous (Latest Albian) Dinosaurs from Winton, Queensland, Australia. PLoS ONE, 2009; 4 (7): e6190 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0006190)

Artistic representations of the three new Australian dinosaur taxa: Australovenator (top); Wintonotitan (middle); Diamantinasaurus (bottom). (Credit: Artwork by: T. Tischler, Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum of Natural History / Scott A. Hocknull, Matt A. White, Travis R. Tischler, Alex G. Cook, Naomi D. Calleja, Trish Sloan, David A. Elliott. New Mid-Cretaceous (Latest Albian) Dinosaurs from Winton, Queensland, Australia. PLoS ONE, 2009; 4 (7): e6190 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0006190)

Reporting on July 3 in the open-access, peer-reviewed journal, PLoS ONE, Scott Hocknull and colleagues at the Queensland Museum and the Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum of Natural History describe the fossils of three new mid-Cretaceous dinosaurs from the Winton Formation in eastern Australia: two giant, herbivorous sauropods and one carnivorous theropod, all of which are to be unveiled in Queensland on July 3. The three fossils add to our knowledge of the Australian dinosaurian record, which is crucial for the understanding of the global paleobiogeography of dinosaurian groups.

Australia’s dinosaurian fossil record is extremely poor, compared with that of other similar-sized continents, such as South America and Africa. However, the mid-Cretaceous Winton Formation in central western Queensland has, in recent years, yielded numerous fossil sites with huge potential for the discovery of new dinosaurian taxa. Between 2006 and 2009, extensive excavations have yielded many well-preserved dinosaur fossils, as well as the remains of other contemporaneous fauna.

In a single, comprehensive, publication, Hocknull and colleagues describe the remains of three individual dinosaur skeletons, found during joint Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum and Queensland Museum digs in two different sites in the Winton Formation. They represent three new genera and species of dinosaur: two giant herbivorous sauropods and a carnivorous theropod.

The carnivore, named by the authors on the paper Australovenator wintonensis (nicknamed “Banjo”) is the most complete meat-eating dinosaur found in Australia, to date and sheds light on the ancestry of the largest-ever meat-eating dinosaurs, the carcharodontosaurs, a group of dinosaurs that became gigantic, like Giganotosaurus.

“The cheetah of his time, Banjo was light and agile,” said lead author Scott Hocknull. “He could run down most prey with ease over open ground. His most distinguishing feature was three large slashing claws on each hand. Unlike some theropods that have small arms (think T. rex), Banjo was different; his arms were a primary weapon.

“He’s Australia’s answer to Velociraptor, but many times bigger and more terrifying.”

The skeleton of Australovenator solves a 28-year-old mystery surrounding an ankle bone found in Victoria, which was originally classified as a dwarf Allosaurus, although this classification remained controversial until the discovery of Australovenator—the researchers are now able to confirm that the ankle bone belonged to the lineage that led to Australovenator.

The two plant-eating theropods, named Witonotitan wattsi (“Clancy”) and Diamantinasaurus matildae (“Matilda”), are different kinds of titanosaur (the largest type of dinosaur ever to have lived). While Witonotitan represents a tall, gracile animal, which might have fitted into a giraffe-like niche, the stocky, solid Diamantinasaurus represents a more hippo-like species.

All three dinosaurs are nicknamed after characters from a world-famous, Australian poet. Banjo Patterson composed Waltzing Matilda in 1885 in Winton, where the song was also first performed (and where the fossils were discovered). Waltzing Matilda is now considered to be Australia’s national song.

In a quirky twist of fate, the song Waltzing Matilda describes the unfortunate demise of a swag-man, who steals a jumbuck (sheep) but is driven to leap into a billabong (an Australian word for a small oxbow lake) to avoid being captured by the police. He ends up drowning in the billabong alongside the stolen sheep.

Banjo and Matilda were found buried together in what turns out to be a 98-million-year-old billabong. Whether they died together or got stuck in the mud together remains a mystery; however, echoing the song, both predator and possible prey met their end at the bottom of a billabong, 98 million years ago. This shows that processes that were working in the area over the last 98 million years are still there today. “Billabongs are a built-in part of the Australian mind,” said Hocknull, “because we associate them with mystery, ghosts and monsters.”

The finding and documentation of the fossils was a 100% Australian effort. Both Matilda and Banjo were prepared by Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum thanks to thousands of hours of volunteer work and philanthropy.

“This is the only place in Australia where you can come off the street and be taught to be a palaeontologist and find, excavate and prepare your own part of Australian natural history,” said Hocknull. The dinosaurs will now be part of a museum collection and this effort will enable future generations of scientists to be involved in a new wave of dinosaur discoveries and to bring the general public in touch with their own natural heritage.”

This collaborative effort links closely with PLoS ONE’s philosophy of making science freely accessible to the general public. “One of my major motivations for submitting to PLoS ONE was the fact that my research will reach a much wider community, including the hundreds of volunteers and public who gave their time and money to the development of natural history collections,” said Hocknull. “They are the backbone of our work (excuse the pun) and they usually never get to see their final product because they rarely subscribe to scientific journals.”

All three new taxa, along with some fragmentary remains from other taxa, indicate a diverse Early Cretaceous sauropod and theropod fauna in Australia, and the finds will help provide a better understanding of the Australian dinosaurian record, which is, in turn, crucial for the understanding of the global palaeobiogeography of dinosaurian groups.

The authors agree that even though hundreds of bones have already been found at the site, these fossils are just the tip of the iceberg. “Many hundreds more fossils from this dig await preparation and there is much more material left to excavate,” they said. Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum and Queensland Museum staff and volunteers will continue to dig at this and other sites in 2010.

The fossils will be unveiled at the Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum of Natural History in Queensland, Australia, July 3 by Anna Bligh, the Premier of Queensland. Stage 1 of the museum, a non-profit, volunteer-driven, science initiative that aims to bring Australian dinosaurs to the world, will also be opened by Ms Bligh on July 3.


Journal reference:

  1. Scott A. Hocknull, Matt A. White, Travis R. Tischler, Alex G. Cook, Naomi D. Calleja, Trish Sloan, David A. Elliott. New Mid-Cretaceous (Latest Albian) Dinosaurs from Winton, Queensland, Australia. PLoS ONE, 2009; 4 (7): e6190 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0006190

Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090703070846.htm

luglio 3, 2009 Posted by | - R. Dinosauri, - Sauropodi, - Teropodi, 1 Cretaceo, America Northern, An. Vertebrates, Articolo sc. di riferimento, FREE ACCESS, Lang. - Italiano, Mesozoic, P - Ritrovamenti fossili, Paleontology / Paleontologia | , , , , , | Lascia un commento

2009-06-12 – Italia: il 4 dinosauro !!! (fourth Italian dinosaur)

Con un po` di ritardo ecco il post su una notizia “eccezonale”.

Un osso ritrovato in sedimenti di origine marina nel Cenomaniano della Sicilia e stato identificato come appartenente a un dinosauro (il quarto ritovato in Italia).

Per info piu` dettagliate: Blog – Teropoda

Riferimento bibliografico:

Garilli, V, et al. “First dinosaur bone from Sicily identified by histology and its palaeobiogeographical implications.” Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie 252.2 (2009):207-216.

giugno 12, 2009 Posted by | - Italia, - R. Dinosauri, An. Vertebrates, Articolo sc. di riferimento, Bl - Top posts, Blogs, Europa, Lang. - Italiano, P - Ritrovamenti fossili, Paleontology / Paleontologia, Theropoda | , , , , , | Lascia un commento

25-05-2009 – Maryland, USA: Chinese dinosaurs at Inner Harbor museum

Maryland Science Center to hatch ‘Chinasaurs’

More than 20 skeletons, other fossils will be on view at Inner Harbor museum

"Chinasaurs: Dinosaur Dynasty"

“Chinasaurs: Dinosaur Dynasty” features 20 skeletons, all of thunder lizards unearthed on the Chinese mainland. The exhibit opens May 23 and runs through Labor Day at the Maryland Science Center. Tickets are $14.95-$20.95. (Baltimore Sun photo by Kim Hairston / May 19, 2009)

 

If the Maryland Science Center has anything to say about it, Baltimoreans will soon think of China as the home of more than chopsticks, serious ping pong players and the giant panda. By the end of the summer, it should also be known as the land of Mamenchisaurus, Szechuanosaurus and Monolophosaurus, not to mention Tuojiangosaurus and Psittacosaurus.

Through Labor Day, dinosaurs from China will be invading Baltimore. And the folks at the Inner Harbor science center couldn’t be happier.

“Some of these have not been found anywhere else in the world,” says Van Reiner, the center’s president and chief executive.

“The dinosaur aficionados of this area are certainly going to see examples of dinosaurs they won’t see anywhere in the United States.”

Chinasaurs: Dinosaur Dynasty, opening Saturday in 7,000 square feet of exhibit space on the museum’s second floor, features 20 skeletons, all of thunder lizards unearthed on the Chinese mainland. Many have never before been displayed outside their native land (“The Chinese have been very protective of their finds,” Reiner says), and most are of prehistoric animals rarely mentioned in scientific textbooks.

That alone shouldn’t be surprising. The rate of dinosaur discoveries has been climbing exponentially in recent years, says Reiner. “Just when they thought they had identified all the dinosaurs, they hadn’t,” he says. “The estimate is that they’ve identified less than 10 percent.”

What might be surprising to dino-philes, as well as thrilling to even casual fans, is the range of fossils on display – from a 10-inch, astonishingly well-preserved Keichousaurus, looking like someone had carefully placed it between two sheets of rock, to a 70-foot-long skeleton of Mamenchisaurus, a creature with the longest neck of all the dinosaurs (think of a giraffe stretched out low to the ground, and you’ll get the idea).

Some of the names should ring familiar. There’s a Protoceratops, famous for being the first dinosaur whose eggs were unearthed (they actually turned out to be Oviraptor eggs, but that discovery didn’t come until nearly 70 years later). And there are several Velociraptors, the herding predators made famous in Jurassic Park.

But most of the names will prove not only unfamiliar, but tongue-twisting. Some, like Szechuanosaurus, sound like they’d be at home in a Chinese restaurant. Others, like Confuciusornis and Tuojiangosaurus (which translates to “two-river lizard”), readily betray their Asian origins.

There’s a skeleton of a Jinghanosaurus, its head peering around a wall into another display. A feathered Caudipteryx, one of those winged creatures that clearly marks the connection between dinosaurs and birds, is captured in rock as though desperately trying to flap its wings one last time. Among the oddest-looking beasts on display is Pachycephalosaur, a relatively small dinosaur whose gigantic skull resembles a football helmet. For the record, scientists don’t believe the creatures head-butted one another, but rather that they would smack each other on the sides of the heads.

And if any of those names give you trouble, try asking around. Dino-philes are usually pretty good with their nomenclature.

“Every few years, you get a new generation of dinosaur fans,” says Brenda Lewis, the science center’s acting director of exhibits. “You get these 3- or 4-year-olds who can’t talk properly, but they can pronounce the names of every dinosaur they see.”

If you go

Chinasaurs opens Saturday at the Maryland Science Center, 601 Light St. Tickets are $14.95-$20.95. Call 410-685-5225 or go to mdsci.org.

maggio 25, 2009 Posted by | - R. Dinosauri, An. Vertebrates, Mostre & Fiere, Musei, Paleontology / Paleontologia, Places | , , , , , | Lascia un commento

2009-05-06 Germania: spettacolare mostra di dinosauri argentini (Argentinian Dinosaurs in Germany – Dinosaurier Argentiniens in Deutschland)

Dinosaurier-Ausstellung Giganten Argentiniens in Bayern

Eine einzigartige Dinosaurier-Schau zeigt 26 Urzeitechsen, die größte davon 37 Meter lang. Drei der Tiere waren noch niemals zuvor ausgestellt.

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Giant Dinosaurs of Argentina in Bavaria, Germany
A singular dinosaur exhibition shows 26 dinosaurs, the largest of them is 37 meters long. Three specimensvwere still never issued before .

Argentinosurus

Argentinosurus

for full article in german language (with more pictures) click here.

maggio 6, 2009 Posted by | - R. Dinosauri, An. Vertebrates, Mostre & Fiere, Paleontology / Paleontologia, Places | , , , , , , , , , | Lascia un commento

2009-05-03 – Dinamite per liberare Dinosauri (Dynamite to reveal Dinosaurs )

Dynamite Used To Reveal New Layer Of Dinosaur Fossils ScienceDaily

What do you do when you have a fossil quarry that has yielded some of the most important and rarest of dinosaur fossils in North America, but the fossil-bearing layer of rock is tilted at 70 degrees and there is so much rock that not even jackhammers can get you to the fossils any longer?

2009-04-30-sauropod-skull 

That was the problem facing Dinosaur National Monument at a Lower Cretaceous dinosaur quarry — the one that has produced the only complete brontosaur skulls from the last 80 million years of the Age of Dinosaurs in North America. The site is so scientifically important that excavations cannot be stopped, yet there was no way to reach the bones.

Dave Larsen, Steve Bors, and Tim George, a blasting team from Rocky Mountain National Park, rode to the rescue in mid-April. Over several days these skilled employees, using their expertise with explosives, blew away the rock covering the fossils and exposed a significant amount of the fossil-bearing layer so that excavation can begin again this year. Without their talents, scientifically important fossils would have remained locked underground in their stony mausoleum.

Fossil excavation often uses small tools, either pneumatic or manual, to carefully remove rock from delicate fossils. However, in some instances, instruments that are more powerful are needed. Although explosives might seem extreme, in the right setting and in the right hands, they are the right tool for the job — staff at Dinosaur National Monument can certainly testify to that.

source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090429131935.htm

maggio 3, 2009 Posted by | - R. Dinosauri, 1 Cretaceo, America Northern, An. Vertebrates, Mesozoic, P - Ritrovamenti fossili, Paleontology / Paleontologia | , , , | Lascia un commento

2009-04-28 – Chongqing, China: “China’s Prehistoric Animal Fossil Exhibition”

Prehistoric “dinosaur”, “mammoth” fossils displayed in Chongqing 

 see the video
 
www.chinaview.cn 2009-04-27 21:49:04

BEIJING, April 27 — A herd of animals led by two “mammoths” and nine “dinosaurs” are causing a stir in the central Chinese city of Chongqing.

    “China’s Prehistoric Animal Fossil Exhibition” is underway at the city’s Liberation Monument Square. More than 30 precious artifacts are on display.

    The show features relics from well-known museums in 8 provinces and cities. Many of the fossils are considered national treasures and date between the Jurassic and the Quatenary periods 190 million years ago.Among the highlights are the bones of nine dinosaurs and a well-preserved woolly mammoth skeleton. Researchers estimate the 2-and-a-half-meter-tall mammoth is about three million years old. A nearby mechanical replica mimics the movements and sound of the real thing.This exhibition runs until May 24th.

    Xinhua News Agency correspondents reporting from Chongqing.

    (Source: XHTV)

 
Editor: Bi Mingxin

aprile 28, 2009 Posted by | - Mammiferi, - R. Dinosauri, An. Vertebrates, Asia, Mostre & Fiere, Paleontology / Paleontologia, Places | , , , , , , , , , , | Lascia un commento

2009-04-08 – Goseong, CHINA: 2nd Dinosaur Expo

Goseong Holds 2nd Dinosaur Expo

The city of Goseong is holding its second World Dinosaur Expo until June 7. Along the southern coast is an area where dinosaur fossil sites formed in the Cretaceous Period of the Mesozoic Era and where scientists from around the world come to study them.Bin Yong-ho, chief administrator of the expo, said, “Goseong is one of the world’s top three locations for fossilized dinosaur footprints, as well as having the highest concentration of tracks in the world. So we wanted to use this natural property to boost tourism. And to acknowledge the importance of the dinosaur fossil footprints, we are holding the World Dinosaur Expo.”

Visitors look at dinosaurs at the Goseong Dinosaur Expo on Mar. 27.

Visitors look at dinosaurs at the Goseong Dinosaur Expo on Mar. 27.

The expo is held every three years, with the first in 2006 attracting over 1.5 million visitors. Supported by the Korean government, it offers several activities to learn about the prehistoric creatures.

While the fossils are certainly the biggest draw, visitors can also be entertained by a variety of attractions, including a dinosaur parade, as well as educational opportunities.

And the city has been waiting since 2005 for its dinosaur footprint fossils to be listed as a World National Heritage by UNESCO. The fossil footprints could be listed in July.

Arirang News

source: http://english.chosun.com/w21data/html/news/200904/200904070028.html

aprile 8, 2009 Posted by | - R. Dinosauri, Mostre & Fiere, Paleontology / Paleontologia, Places | , , , , , , | Lascia un commento

2009-04-03 – I Sauropodi “aspirapolvere” (Sauropods “vacuum cleaner”)

Uno studio di un iologo evoluzionista australiano pubblicato Biology letter supporta la teoria dei Sauropodi aspiravolvere. Secondo tale studio i sauropodi non potevano sollevare la testa (la pressione sanguigna da sopportare per inviare sangue al cerevello), tuttavia la loro stazza gli permetteva comunque di arrivare a raccogliere foglie da rami inaccessibili ad altri erbivori mentre il lungo collo gli permetteva di sostare in luogo e di agire appunto come un aspirapolvere agendo tutto intorno

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Sauropod dinos kept a level head

Anna Salleh
ABC

Long-necked sauropod dinosaurs would had to have used far too much energy to hold their neck upright and browse tall trees, says an Australian evolutionary biologist.

Dr Roger Seymour of the University of Adelaide reports his findings in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters.

Sauropods were about as heavy as a whale and had necks nearly five times the length of a giraffe’s.

The animals have generally been reconstructed with upright necks and it was assumed they grazed on tall trees.

But Seymour has calculated that to do this the dinosaurs would have needed to use 50% of the energy they consumed just to support their long necks.

“I think most people would agree that if you spent half of your energy pumping the blood around the body it would be an enormous cost,” says Seymour, who studies blood pressure in animals.

Seymour says the longer an animal’s neck, the higher the blood pressure it requires to pump blood to the brain.

“The giraffe’s blood pressure is twice that of other mammals,” he says.

While a human has a blood pressure of around 100 millimetres of mercury, a giraffe has a blood pressure of 200, says Seymour.

He says a sauropod with an upright 9-metre neck would have had to have a blood pressure of 700.

“That is exceptionally high,” says Seymour.

Seymour says to produce such a high pressure, the sauropod would need a heart with a 2-tonne left ventricle, which would be a challenge to fit in the animal.

And his most recent research has calculated that 50% of the energy it consumed would be used just to circulate the sauropod’s blood.

“Even though they may have had access to a larger amount of food, it would have cost more than the gain, basically,” says Seymour.

He says a giraffe with a 2-metre neck uses around 20% of its energy to circulate blood and humans use about 10%.

The ‘vacuum cleaner principle’

Previously, it was thought that sauropods must have been semi-aquatic or amphibious to support their enormous bulk.

When palaeontologists decided the animals were terrestrial, they assumed the neck was used like a giraffe’s, says Seymour.

But, he says, the sauropod’s enormous size meant the animal would have had many options for feeding even without having to lift their long neck vertically.

“Even without raising the head, these animals could browse higher than a giraffe,” says Seymour.

Seymour says feeding with a horizontal neck meant the animal could keep the bulk of its body in one place while using its long neck to graze in numerous places.

“It’s the vacuum cleaner principle,” he says.

source: http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2009/04/01/2530800.htm?site=science&topic=latest

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Other links:

Long-necked dinosaurs ‘kept their heads down’

Telegraph.co.uk - ‎1-apr-2009‎
Long-necked dinosaurs kept their heads down and did not raise them to the trees to graze, according to a new study. By Kate Devlin, Medical Correspondent

aprile 3, 2009 Posted by | - R. Dinosauri, - Sauropodi, Articolo sc. di riferimento, Bl - Top posts, Italiano (riassunto), Lang. - Italiano, P - morfologia funzionale, P - Paleoetologia, Paleontology / Paleontologia, X - Riviste e Multimedia | , , , , | Lascia un commento

2009-04-02 – New York, USA: Scheletro di dinosauro non venduto all`asta (dino skeleton unsold)

 Complete dino skeleton doesn’t sell at NY auction

In this photo released by the I.M. Chait Gallery, a complete 150-million-year-old dinosaur skeleton, top right, joins other fossils prior to an auction of prehistoric relics in New York, Saturday, March 21, 2009. The I.M. Chait Gallery of Beverly Hills, Calif., will offer it and other items such as a 7-foot-tall complete skeleton of a 20,000-year-old juvenile wooly mammoth, and the fossilized skeleton of 20-foot-long marine lizard at a New York auction later that day. (AP Photo/I.M. Chait Gallery, Josh Chait)

In this photo released by the I.M. Chait Gallery, a complete 150-million-year-old dinosaur skeleton, top right, joins other fossils prior to an auction of prehistoric relics in New York, Saturday, March 21, 2009. The I.M. Chait Gallery of Beverly Hills, Calif., will offer it and other items such as a 7-foot-tall complete skeleton of a 20,000-year-old juvenile wooly mammoth, and the fossilized skeleton of 20-foot-long marine lizard at a New York auction later that day. (AP Photo/I.M. Chait Gallery, Josh Chait)

NEW YORK (AP) — A New York gallery says a 150-million-year-old complete skeleton of a dinosaur has failed to sell at auction.

Josh Chait (CHATE’) of I.M. Chait Gallery/Auctioneers says two museums interested in the fossil failed to meet the minimum price of nearly $300,000 during the auction Saturday. He declined to identify the two parties.

Chait says the gallery is still trying broker a deal to sell the 9-foot-long dryosaurus fossil to a museum. Dryosauruses were two-footed, plant-eating creatures.

The auction also included the 7-foot-tall complete skeleton of a 20,000-year-old, juvenile wooly mammoth, and the fossilized skeleton of 20-foot-long marine lizard. Unidentified private collectors bought the mammoth fossil for $55,000 and the lizard fossil for $67,000.

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On The Net:

I.M. Chait Gallery, http://www.chait.com/

Western Paleontological, http://www.westernpaleolabs.com/

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP’s earlier story is below.

NEW YORK (AP) — A bit of Jurassic Park is going on sale with a 150-million-year-old complete skeleton of a dinosaur going on the auction block in New York.

The I.M. Chait Gallery says the fossil of the 9-foot-long dryosaurus dating from the Jurassic era is one of only two of its kind in the world. The gallery said it could bring up to $500,000 at Saturday’s auction.

Gallery operator Josh Chait says the fossil was taken from private land in Wyoming in 1993 and is being sold by Utah-based Western Paleontological Laboratories.

The auction also included the 7-foot-tall complete skeleton of a 20,000-year-old, juvenile wooly mammoth, and the fossilized skeleton of 20-foot-long marine lizard.

 source: http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hYSWYIeUfch_nCqxmXRnxvfHxRfAD972M74G0

Other links:

9-foot dinosaur skeleton is no-sale at auction

CNN - ‎22-mar-2009‎
Fossils including dinosaur skeletons are on display at the IM Chait Gallery on Saturday. Auctioneers at the IM Chait Gallery had hoped the

aprile 2, 2009 Posted by | - R. Dinosauri, An. Vertebrates, Aste, Collezionismo, Paleontology / Paleontologia | , , , , , , , | Lascia un commento

2009-03-17 – Trappola mortale per i piccoli dinosauri (Sinornithomimus herd)

Sulla rivista “Acta Palaeontologica Polonica”

Trappola mortale per i piccoli dinosauri

I resti suggeriscono che gli individui ancora immaturi venissero lasciati badare a loro stessi mentre gli adulti erano occupati nella costruzione del nido o nella cova delle uova

Un branco di giovani dinosauri simili a uccelli hanno trovato la morte nei fangosi margini di un lago circa 90 milioni di anni fa, secondo quanto annunciato da un gruppo di paleontologi cinesi e statunitensi che hanno scavato in un sito del Deserto del Gobi, nella parte occidentale della Mongolia interna.

L’improvvisa morte degli animali in una trappola di fango fornisce una rara istantanea del loro comportamento sociale. Composto soltanto da esemplari giovani di una singola specie di dinosauri ornitomimidi (Sinornithomimus dongi), il branco suggerisce che gli individui ancora immaturi venissero lasciati badare a loro stessi mentre gli adulti erano occupati nella costruzione de nido o nella cova delle uova.

“Non c’erano adulti intorno, questi cuccioli scorrazzavano da soli”, ha spiegato Paul Sereno, professore dell’Università di Chicago ed esploratore del National Geographic e coautore dell’articolo apparso sulla rivista “Acta Palaeontologica Polonica”.

Le prime ossa vennero scoperte da un geologo cinese nel 1978 alla base di una piccola collina in una desola regione del Deserto del Gobi e circa 20 anni fa un gruppo sino-giapponese estrasse i primi scheletri, battezzando il dinosauro Sinornithomimus (“che somiglia a un uccello cinese”).

Sereno e colleghi hanno seguito lo scavo di uno scheletro dopo l’altro fino a penetrare in profondità nella base della collina. Complessivamente, sono stati estratti 25 individui di età compresa tra uno e sette anni, come determinato dagli anelli di crescita annuale delle loro ossa.

Il gruppo ha poi registrato in meticolosamente la posizione di tutte le ossa e i dettagli degli strati di roccia per cercare di comprendere in che modo cosi tanti individui di una stessa specie siano periti nello stesso luogo. Gli scheletri mostrano un ottimo stato di conservazione e il fatto che siano tutti nella stessa direzione fa supporre che siano morti anche entro un arco temporale molto breve.

I dettagli forniscono le prove di una piccola tragedia. “Gli animali hanno subito una morte lenta in una trappola di fango, e la loro agitazione è servita solo ad attrarre predatori o animali che si nutrivano di carogne”, ha concluso Sereno. Di solito gli eventi atmosferici, l’azione di altri animali o il trasporto di ossa cancellano qualunque prova diretta delle cause di morte. Perciò questo sito è unico per ricchezza di dettagli sugli animali e sulla loro morte.” (fc)

fonte: lescienze

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Photo: “Teen” Dinosaurs Roamed in Herds, Mass Grave Suggests

Young Sinornithomimus dinosaurs may have wandered in packs (illustrated at top), fending for themselves while adults were busy nesting, according to a recent report.
Two juvenile Sinornithomimus skeletons (photo at bottom) died when they were a little over one year old. In their rib cages are stomach stones and the carbonized remains of the last plants they consumed.

Illustration by Todd Marshall, courtesy Project Exploration; photograph by Mike Hettwer, courtesy Project Exploration

Illustration by Todd Marshall, courtesy Project Exploration; photograph by Mike Hettwer, courtesy Project Exploration

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MSU paleontologist authors paper on social behavior among adolescent dinosaurs

March 16, 2009 — By Michael Becker, MSU News Service

BOZEMAN — A Montana State University researcher is the lead author of a recently published paper that sheds new light on the behaviors of dinosaur families and gives a rare glimpse into the social life — and death — of a herd of dinosaurs.
David Varricchio, an assistant professor and paleontologist in the Department of Earth Sciences, and colleagues from the University of Chicago and China wrote the paper after a 2001 expedition to the Gobi Desert. It was published in December in the journal Acta Palaeontologica Polonica.
The paper describes the team’s work at a 90-million-year-old dry lake bed in western Mongolia. Over the past decade, paleontologists have recovered more than two dozen fossilized skeletons of the dinosaur Sinornithomimus.
All of the skeletons belonged to animals between one and seven years old and were well-preserved. Most of skeletons were facing the same direction, suggesting that they died together in a short period of time, Varricchio said.
“Normally there are a lot of post-mortem effects that transpire between when a dinosaur died and when it was buried,” he said. “This site really provides, in my mind, better evidence than any other dinosaur locality of how the dinosaurs perished, and that’s pretty rare for any fossil vertebrate.”

Varricchio believes that the dinosaurs probably became mired in the mud around a partially dry lakebed during the Cretaceous Period. During times of drought, as were common in the region at the time, these oases likely attracted many animals, he said.

Many of those animals were probably weak from starvation and dehydration, which could explain why so many of them became trapped in the mud. It’s a phenomenon that’s still seen around dry desert lakes today, he said.

The fact that so many young dinosaurs of the same species died at roughly the same time and in the same place tells paleontologists something about the social behavior of the animals, Varricchio said. It may be that young dinosaurs — too old for the nest but not yet old enough to fend for themselves — roamed together in social herds, he said.

“We get a snapshot-like view of what a herd of these animals looked like back in the Cretaceous Period,” Varricchio said. “That snapshot gives us a glimpse into their biology and their behavior.”

Past studies have theorized that dinosaurs had strong and complicated parenting relationships with their young, Varricchio said. Female — and even male — dinosaurs were tied to a nesting spot for the breeding portions of the year while they took care of their eggs, he said.

The fact that the parent dinosaurs were busy with the eggs could explain why a group of adolescent dinosaurs was roaming together without adult supervision, Varricchio said. These and most dinosaurs would take several years, at least, to fully mature. Groups of juveniles would consist of those individuals too old to be cared for by parents, but too young to breed, he said.

“This site argues that this might be a general trend among dinosaurs,” and is further evidence of the theory that dinosaurs were dedicated parents, he said.

Varricchio’s collaborators include Paul Sereno from the University of Chicago, Tan Lin from he Department of Land and Resources of Inner Mongolia and Zhao Xijin from the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Also on the team were Jeffrey Wilson from the University of Michigan and Gabrielle Lyon from Project Exploration.

The work was funded by the National Geographic Society and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

 

 

 

 

Contact: David Varricchio at 406-994-6907 or djv@montana.edu.
 
 Hi-Resolution Image or PDF Available:
[View or Download] 1. MSU’s David Varricchio examines fossils in his laboratory in the basement of Traphagen Hall. (MSU photo by Kelly Gorham)

source: http://www.montana.edu/cpa/news/nwview.php?article=6951

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Teen dinosaurs hung out, got into trouble

MSNBC - ‎17 ore fa‎
Like teenagers today, some juvenile dinosaurs used to hang out together, according to research announced today. Also like teens, the dinos sometimes hung
Boston Globe

 

Frozen in time: Dinosaur herd’s mass grave unearthed

ABC Online - ‎5 ore fa‎
In the rocky desert of Inner Mongolia, an international team of palaeontologists has unearthed a mass grave of young dinosaurs. The 25 birdlike dinosaurs
Montana State University

marzo 17, 2009 Posted by | - R. Dinosauri, - Teropodi, 1 Cretaceo, An. Vertebrates, Asia, Bl - Top posts, Mesozoic, P - Paleoetologia, P - Preservazione eccezionale, P - Ritrovamenti fossili, Paleontology / Paleontologia | , , , , , , | Lascia un commento

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