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2008-10-31 – La risposta delle foreste pluviali alle variazioni climatiche

La ricerca su una pianta (Symphonia globulifera) i cui discensenti risalgono a 45 milioni di anni fa ha portato alcuni ricercatori a fare considerazioni sugli adattamenti delle piante della foresta pluviale durante le variazioni climatiche.

In breve le analisi genetiche hanno mostrato un differente comportamento delle popolazioni che in passato hanno colonizato l’America: le popolazioni instauratesi nell’area amazzonica mostrano un maggiore drift  grazie al fatto che hanno posperato in un ambiente favorevole, al contrario di quelle del Centro America che invece hanno dovuto resistere a condizioni più proibitive (calore e aridità) e caratterizzate dunque da minore drift .

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‘Living Fossil’ Tree Contains Genetic Imprints Of Rain Forests Under Climate Change

ScienceDaily (Oct. 31, 2008) — A “living fossil” tree species is helping a University of Michigan researcher understand how tropical forests responded to past climate change and how they may react to global warming in the future.

The research appears in the November issue of the journal Evolution.

Symphonia globulifera is a widespread tropical tree with a history that goes back some 45 million years in Africa, said Christopher Dick, an assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology who is lead author on the paper. It is unusual among tropical trees in having a well-studied fossil record, partly because the oil industry uses its distinctive pollen fossils as a stratigraphic tool.

About 15 to 18 million years ago, deposits of fossil pollen suggest, Symphonia suddenly appeared in South America and then in Central America. Unlike kapok, a tropical tree with a similar distribution that Dick also has studied, Symphonia isn’t well-suited for traveling across the ocean—its seeds dry out easily and can’t tolerate saltwater. So how did Symphonia reach the neotropics? Most likely the seeds hitched rides from Africa on rafts of vegetation, as monkeys did, Dick said. Even whole trunks, which can send out shoots when they reach a suitable resting place, may have made the journey. Because Central and South American had no land connection at the time, Symphonia must have colonized each location separately.

Once Symphonia reached its new home, it spread throughout the neotropical rain forests. By measuring genetic diversity between existing populations, Dick and coworker Myriam Heuertz of the Université Libre de Bruxelles were able to reconstruct environmental histories of the areas Symphonia colonized.

“For Central America, we see a pattern in Symphonia that also has been found in a number of other species, with highly genetically differentiated populations across the landscape,” Dick said. “We think the pattern is the result of the distinctive forest history of Mesoamerica, which was relatively dry during the glacial period 10,000 years ago. In many places the forests were confined to hilltops or the wettest lowland regions. What we’re seeing in the patterns of genetic diversity is a signature of that forest history.”

In the core Amazon Basin, which was moist throughout the glacial period, allowing for more or less continuous forest, less genetic diversity is found among populations, Dick said. “There’s less differentiation across the whole Amazon Basin than there is among sites in lower Central America.”

The study is the first to make such comparisons of genetic diversity patterns in Central and South America. “We think similar patterns will be found in other widespread species,” Dick said.

Learning how Symphonia responded to past climate conditions may be helpful for predicting how forests will react to future environmental change, Dick said.

“Under scenarios of increased warmth and drying, we can see that populations are likely to be constricted, particularly in Central America, but also that they’re likely to persist, because Symphonia has persisted throughout Central America and the Amazon basin. That tells us that some things can endure in spite of a lot of forest change. However, past climate changes were not combined with deforestation, as is the case today. That combination of factors could be detrimental to many species—especially those with narrow ranges—in the next century.”

The researchers received funding from the National Science Foundation and the National Fund for Scientific Research of Belgium.


Adapted from materials provided by University of Michigan.
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Scientific article:

Evolution – Volume 62 Issue 11, Pages 2760 – 2774 –

THE COMPLEX BIOGEOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF A WIDESPREAD TROPICAL TREE SPECIES

Christopher W. Dick 1,2,3,4 and Myriam Heuertz 5,6

ABSTRACT

Many tropical forest tree species have broad geographic ranges, and fossil records indicate that population disjunctions in some species were established millions of years ago. Here we relate biogeographic history to patterns of population differentiation, mutational and demographic processes in the widespread rainforest tree Symphonia globulifera using ribosomal (ITS) and chloroplast DNA sequences and nuclear microsatellite (nSSR) loci. Fossil records document sweepstakes dispersal origins of Neotropical S. globulifera populations from Africa during the Miocene. Despite historical long-distance gene flow, nSSR differentiation across 13 populations from Costa Rica, Panama, Ecuador (east and west of Andes) and French Guiana was pronounced (FST= 0.14, RST= 0.39, P < 0.001) and allele-size mutations contributed significantly (RST > FST) to the divergences between cis- and trans-Andean populations. Both DNA sequence and nSSR data reflect contrasting demographic histories in lower Mesoamerica and Amazonia. Amazon populations show weak phylogeographic structure and deviation from drift–mutation equilibrium indicating recent population expansion. In Mesoamerica, genetic drift was strong and contributed to marked differentiation among populations. The genetic structure of S. globulifera contains fingerprints of drift-dispersal processes and phylogeographic footprints of geological uplifts and sweepstakes dispersal.

 

ottobre 31, 2008 - Posted by | Articolo sc. di riferimento, Genetic / Genetica, Italiano (riassunto), P - Paleobotanica, Paleontology / Paleontologia | , , , , , , , , , ,

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