Paleonews

Il blog dedicato ai Paleontologi !!!!

2009-09-03 – Australia: 3 nuovi dinosauri (Australia, 3 new dinosaurs)

Fossili di 3 grandi dinosauri scoperti in Australia

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Fossili di tre nuove specie di dinosauri sono stati scoperti in Australia, di cui quello di un carnivoro più grande del Velociraptor dei film di Jurassic Park, lasciando intendere che l’Australia potrebbe avere un passato preistorico più complesso di quanto si pensi.

I tre fossili, due di erbivori e uno di un carnivoro — i primi resti di grandi dinosauri rinvenuti dal 1981 — sono stati trovati nel Queensland e risalgono al Cretaceo, 98 milioni di anni fa.

“Questa scoperta ci fa conoscere non solo due affascinanti giganti dal collo lungo del continente australiano antico, ma anche il nostro primo grande predatore” ha detto oggi il paleontologo John Long, del Museo Victoria.

Il paleontologo Ben Kear dell’Università La Trobe di Melbourne ha detto che la scoperta apre la strada a nuovi studi sui dinosauri australiani e il loro habitat.

“L’Australia è una delle grandi risorse poco sfruttate per la comprensione della vita nel periodo dei dinosauri”, ha detto Kear. “Questo … farà sicuramente crescere l’interesse nelle finora incomplete ma rilevanti scoperte in questo continente”.

fonte:

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Triple Fossil Find Puts Australia Back On The Dinosaur Map

ScienceDaily (July 3, 2009) — Scientists have discovered three new species of Australian dinosaur discovered in a prehistoric billabong in Western Queensland.

Artistic representations of the three new Australian dinosaur taxa: Australovenator (top); Wintonotitan (middle); Diamantinasaurus (bottom). (Credit: Artwork by: T. Tischler, Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum of Natural History / Scott A. Hocknull, Matt A. White, Travis R. Tischler, Alex G. Cook, Naomi D. Calleja, Trish Sloan, David A. Elliott. New Mid-Cretaceous (Latest Albian) Dinosaurs from Winton, Queensland, Australia. PLoS ONE, 2009; 4 (7): e6190 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0006190)

Artistic representations of the three new Australian dinosaur taxa: Australovenator (top); Wintonotitan (middle); Diamantinasaurus (bottom). (Credit: Artwork by: T. Tischler, Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum of Natural History / Scott A. Hocknull, Matt A. White, Travis R. Tischler, Alex G. Cook, Naomi D. Calleja, Trish Sloan, David A. Elliott. New Mid-Cretaceous (Latest Albian) Dinosaurs from Winton, Queensland, Australia. PLoS ONE, 2009; 4 (7): e6190 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0006190)

Reporting on July 3 in the open-access, peer-reviewed journal, PLoS ONE, Scott Hocknull and colleagues at the Queensland Museum and the Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum of Natural History describe the fossils of three new mid-Cretaceous dinosaurs from the Winton Formation in eastern Australia: two giant, herbivorous sauropods and one carnivorous theropod, all of which are to be unveiled in Queensland on July 3. The three fossils add to our knowledge of the Australian dinosaurian record, which is crucial for the understanding of the global paleobiogeography of dinosaurian groups.

Australia’s dinosaurian fossil record is extremely poor, compared with that of other similar-sized continents, such as South America and Africa. However, the mid-Cretaceous Winton Formation in central western Queensland has, in recent years, yielded numerous fossil sites with huge potential for the discovery of new dinosaurian taxa. Between 2006 and 2009, extensive excavations have yielded many well-preserved dinosaur fossils, as well as the remains of other contemporaneous fauna.

In a single, comprehensive, publication, Hocknull and colleagues describe the remains of three individual dinosaur skeletons, found during joint Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum and Queensland Museum digs in two different sites in the Winton Formation. They represent three new genera and species of dinosaur: two giant herbivorous sauropods and a carnivorous theropod.

The carnivore, named by the authors on the paper Australovenator wintonensis (nicknamed “Banjo”) is the most complete meat-eating dinosaur found in Australia, to date and sheds light on the ancestry of the largest-ever meat-eating dinosaurs, the carcharodontosaurs, a group of dinosaurs that became gigantic, like Giganotosaurus.

“The cheetah of his time, Banjo was light and agile,” said lead author Scott Hocknull. “He could run down most prey with ease over open ground. His most distinguishing feature was three large slashing claws on each hand. Unlike some theropods that have small arms (think T. rex), Banjo was different; his arms were a primary weapon.

“He’s Australia’s answer to Velociraptor, but many times bigger and more terrifying.”

The skeleton of Australovenator solves a 28-year-old mystery surrounding an ankle bone found in Victoria, which was originally classified as a dwarf Allosaurus, although this classification remained controversial until the discovery of Australovenator—the researchers are now able to confirm that the ankle bone belonged to the lineage that led to Australovenator.

The two plant-eating theropods, named Witonotitan wattsi (“Clancy”) and Diamantinasaurus matildae (“Matilda”), are different kinds of titanosaur (the largest type of dinosaur ever to have lived). While Witonotitan represents a tall, gracile animal, which might have fitted into a giraffe-like niche, the stocky, solid Diamantinasaurus represents a more hippo-like species.

All three dinosaurs are nicknamed after characters from a world-famous, Australian poet. Banjo Patterson composed Waltzing Matilda in 1885 in Winton, where the song was also first performed (and where the fossils were discovered). Waltzing Matilda is now considered to be Australia’s national song.

In a quirky twist of fate, the song Waltzing Matilda describes the unfortunate demise of a swag-man, who steals a jumbuck (sheep) but is driven to leap into a billabong (an Australian word for a small oxbow lake) to avoid being captured by the police. He ends up drowning in the billabong alongside the stolen sheep.

Banjo and Matilda were found buried together in what turns out to be a 98-million-year-old billabong. Whether they died together or got stuck in the mud together remains a mystery; however, echoing the song, both predator and possible prey met their end at the bottom of a billabong, 98 million years ago. This shows that processes that were working in the area over the last 98 million years are still there today. “Billabongs are a built-in part of the Australian mind,” said Hocknull, “because we associate them with mystery, ghosts and monsters.”

The finding and documentation of the fossils was a 100% Australian effort. Both Matilda and Banjo were prepared by Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum thanks to thousands of hours of volunteer work and philanthropy.

“This is the only place in Australia where you can come off the street and be taught to be a palaeontologist and find, excavate and prepare your own part of Australian natural history,” said Hocknull. The dinosaurs will now be part of a museum collection and this effort will enable future generations of scientists to be involved in a new wave of dinosaur discoveries and to bring the general public in touch with their own natural heritage.”

This collaborative effort links closely with PLoS ONE’s philosophy of making science freely accessible to the general public. “One of my major motivations for submitting to PLoS ONE was the fact that my research will reach a much wider community, including the hundreds of volunteers and public who gave their time and money to the development of natural history collections,” said Hocknull. “They are the backbone of our work (excuse the pun) and they usually never get to see their final product because they rarely subscribe to scientific journals.”

All three new taxa, along with some fragmentary remains from other taxa, indicate a diverse Early Cretaceous sauropod and theropod fauna in Australia, and the finds will help provide a better understanding of the Australian dinosaurian record, which is, in turn, crucial for the understanding of the global palaeobiogeography of dinosaurian groups.

The authors agree that even though hundreds of bones have already been found at the site, these fossils are just the tip of the iceberg. “Many hundreds more fossils from this dig await preparation and there is much more material left to excavate,” they said. Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum and Queensland Museum staff and volunteers will continue to dig at this and other sites in 2010.

The fossils will be unveiled at the Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum of Natural History in Queensland, Australia, July 3 by Anna Bligh, the Premier of Queensland. Stage 1 of the museum, a non-profit, volunteer-driven, science initiative that aims to bring Australian dinosaurs to the world, will also be opened by Ms Bligh on July 3.


Journal reference:

  1. Scott A. Hocknull, Matt A. White, Travis R. Tischler, Alex G. Cook, Naomi D. Calleja, Trish Sloan, David A. Elliott. New Mid-Cretaceous (Latest Albian) Dinosaurs from Winton, Queensland, Australia. PLoS ONE, 2009; 4 (7): e6190 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0006190

Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090703070846.htm

Annunci

luglio 3, 2009 Posted by | - R. Dinosauri, - Sauropodi, - Teropodi, 1 Cretaceo, America Northern, An. Vertebrates, Articolo sc. di riferimento, FREE ACCESS, Lang. - Italiano, Mesozoic, P - Ritrovamenti fossili, Paleontology / Paleontologia | , , , , , | Lascia un commento

2009-03-06 – Macropinna microstoma: Il pesce con la testa trasparente (transparent-head fish)

 Il mistero del pesce trasparente

Macropinna microstoma
Ingrandisci la foto

Abita negli abissi marini, anche a 800 metri di profondità e da quelle parti non c’è molta luce. Per questo ha sviluppato una vista molto speciale. (Federica Ceccherini 2 marzo 2009)

Avvistato per la prima volta nel 1939 il pesce Macropinna microstoma, che abita nel mare al largo della California, con il suo cranio trasparente era rimasto un mistero a lungo.
Ma dopo vari studi un gruppo di ricercatori di Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute ha finalmente svelato i suoi segreti.
Vivendo negli oscuri fondali marini, fino a 800 metri, questo buffo pesce ha sviluppato una vista speciale, grazie alla forma degli occhi e al cranio trasparente. Che gli permettono di raccogliere e immagazzinare tutta la luce necessaria per vedere anche nella semi oscurità. Gli occhi inoltre possono muoversi, secondo gli scienziati, all’interno della copertura trasparente, permettendo di controllare tutto quello che gira loro intorno. In particolare le prede, piccoli pesci di cui si nutrono e che catturano con manovre molto veloci e precise.
La calotta trasparente rende perfettamente visibili tutti gli organi interni della sua testa, conferendo all’animale un buffo aspetto. I ricercatori hanno potuto riprendere l’animale grazie a un veicolo comandato a distanza.
Gurda anche il video (in inglese)

fonte: focus.it

 

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Copeia 2008(4):780-784. 2008 – doi: 10.1643/CG-07-082

Macropinna microstoma and the Paradox of Its Tubular Eyes

Bruce H. Robison1 and Kim R. Reisenbichler1

Abstract:

The opisthoproctid fish Macropinna microstoma occupies lower mesopelagic depths in Monterey Bay and elsewhere in the subarctic and temperate North Pacific. Like several other species in the family, Macropinna has upward-directed tubular eyes and a tiny, terminal mouth. This arrangement is such that in their upright position, the visual field of these highly specialized eyes does not include the mouth, which makes it difficult to understand how feeding takes place. In situ observations and laboratory studies reveal that the eyes of Macropinna can change position from dorsally-directed to rostrally-directed, which resolves the apparent paradox. The eyes are contained within a transparent shield that covers the top of the head and may provide protection for the eyes from the tentacles of cnidarians, one of the apparent sources of the food of Macropinna.

Full TextPDF (2931 KB)

marzo 6, 2009 Posted by | - Pesci / Fishes, America Northern, An. Vertebrates, Articolo sc. di riferimento, Attuale, Bio-Zoology / Bio-Zoologia, FREE ACCESS, Lang. - Italiano, P - Evoluzione | , , , , , , | Lascia un commento

2009-03-05 – Teropodi con postura da uccelli (Dinosaur imprints, birdlike arm anatomy)

Tracce di un Teropode a riposo (Giurassico inferiore, Utah – USA) rivelano una postura da uccello

Vedi approfondimento sul Blog Theropoda:

Un nuovo sito icnologico dimostra che i theropodi si accucciavano come… (Milner et al., 2009)

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Sitting dinosaur leaves karate chop handprints – March 04, 2009

45376624.jpgAncient meat-eating dinosaurs held their arms with palms facing inwards like their bird descendants, a rare set of 198-million-year-old fossilised handprints has revealed. An analysis of the prints, published this week in PLoS One, supports theories that even very early therapods [lit. ‘beast feet’] such as tyrannosaurs and velociraptors had bird-like forelimbs, and walked only on two legs, well before they evolved feathery wings.

The handprints came from a dinosaur that sat down on the edge of a lake in St George, Utah, and extended its arms far enough to leave sediment marks. Six other resting dinosaur traces have been reported before, but they all lack clear hand prints.

This means, reports the Chicago Tribune, that we must banish images of tyrannosaurs holding their forearms like monkeys, with palms facing downwards – a posture that palaeontologists apparently term the “bunny position” – as depicted in Jurassic Park. Instead, we must imagine that dinosaurs were extremely good at holding basketballs.

“What this seems to imply is that, even from fairly early in their history, dinosaurs were entirely bipedal and weren’t using their forearms to support themselves in any way,” paleontologist Tom Holtz of the University of Maryland, says. “Because of that, the hands could specialize as weapons, to grab on to a struggling animal or to fight with other dinosaurs.”

Image: Dilophosaurus wetherilli in bird-like resting pose/Heather Kyoht Luterman

source: Nature.com

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What a dinosaur handprint reveals

Los Angeles Times – ‎3-mar-2009‎
At left, dinosaur tracks with hand prints show bird-like inward-facing palms at Johnson Farm, Utah. At right, an artist’s reconstruction shows the formation
National Geographic —————————————————————————–

 

 free access article on PlosOne

Bird-Like Anatomy, Posture, and Behavior Revealed by an Early Jurassic Theropod Dinosaur Resting Trace

Andrew R. C. Milner, Jerald D. Harris, Martin G. Lockley, James I. Kirkland, Neffra A. Matthews

Abstract PDF

 

 

marzo 5, 2009 Posted by | - R. Dinosauri, - Teropodi, - Uccelli / Birds, 2 Jurassic / Giurassico, America Northern, An. Vertebrates, Articolo sc. di riferimento, Bl - Top posts, FREE ACCESS, Mesozoic, P - Evoluzione, P - Impronte, P - morfologia funzionale, P - Paleoetologia, P - Ritrovamenti fossili, Paleontology / Paleontologia | , , , , , | Lascia un commento

2009-02-17 – Panphagia Protos: il primo dinosauro onnivoro (earliest onnivore dinosaur)

go to the free access scientific article:

 A Basal Sauropodomorph (Dinosauria: Saurischia) from the Ischigualasto Formation (Triassic, Carnian) and the Early Evolution of Sauropodomorpha

vei appofondimenti sui blog:

Theropoda: Panphagia protos (Martinez & Alcober, 2009), Eoraptor e l’origine dei theropodi

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ARGENTINA: SCOPERTO DINOSAURO ‘ANELLO MANCANTE’ EVOLUZIONE

(ANSA) – BUENOS AIRES, 16 FEB – Nel parco naturale argentino di Ichigualasto e’ stato ritrovato lo scheletro di un dinosauro di piccole dimensioni, identificato come il primo ‘dino’ onnivoro ad aver vissuto sulla terra ed anello mancante, affermano gli archeologi di Buenos Aires, tra i bipedi carnivori e i colossi erbivori a quattro zampe. E’ stato battezzato Panphagia Protos (‘il primo a mangiare tutto’), e’ di dimensioni piccole (misura circa un metro e mezzo di lunghezza) ed il suo scopritore, Ricardo Martinez, lo definisce quale l’anello mancante grazie al quale la scienza potra’ completare le tappe evolutive che portarono all’avvento sul pianeta di ‘erbivori mostruosi’ di dimensioni enormi, capaci di consumare tonnellate di alimenti vegetali al giorno. Il Panphagia, che presenta una dentatura adatta a consumare sia carne sia piante, dimostra che l’evoluzione di animali grandissimi, come per esempio il brontosauro, incomincio’ molto prima di quanto si fosse ipotizzato finora, ossia circa 225 milioni di anni fa, praticamente in corrispondenza con l’avvento dei dinosauri stessi sulla Terra. La scoperta e’ stata effettuata qualche tempo fa all’interno parco naturale argentino di Ichigualasto, nella provincia di San Juan, un luogo soprannominato ‘la culla dei dinosauri’ per la sua ricchezza di reperti ossei: e’ infatti lo stesso luogo in cui nel 1991 fu ritrovato l’Eoraptor Lunensis, secondo vari scienziati, il piu’ antico dinosauro mai recuperato. (ANSA). JFC-RIG
16/02/2009 20:02

fonte: http://www.ansa.it/ambiente/notizie/notiziari/natura/20090216200234826092.html

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Missing dinosaur link found in Argentina

BUENOS AIRES (AFP) — Scientists have found fossil remains of an omnivorous dinosaur in Argentina — a missing link to the carnivores, a researcher said Monday.

“It is an omnivore — in other words it ate everything (plants and meat) — which is the missing link between carnivorous dinosaurs and giant four-footed herbivores,” said Oscar Alcober, also director of the Natural Sciences Museum in San Juan, 1,200 kilometers (745 miles) west of Buenos Aires.

“This is a very important piece of the puzzle on the origin of dinosaurs,” said Alcober.

Alcober and Ricardo Martinez, chief of the museum’s paleontology division, found the remains three years ago in the Ischigualasto-Valle de la Luna park, north of the provincial capital San Juan. They released their findings Monday in the online journal of peer reviewed science PlosOne.org.

Argentina has earned fame as a bit of a Jurassic Park in the 1980s with discoveries including fossils in Neuquen of the Argentinosaurus Huinculensis, the largest known herbivore, at over 40 meters (131 ft) long.

Later, in 1993, scientists found remains of the Giganotosaurus Carolinii, the largest known carnivorous dinosaur amid dozens of fossil fields still being explored.

source:  http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5jIDsA9kMjE-ZKmBcZ5hmtlToPjqw

A Basal Sauropodomorph (Dinosauria: Saurischia) from the Ischigualasto Formation (Triassic, Carnian) and the Early Evolution of Sauropodomorpha

Ricardo N. Martinez, Oscar A. Alcober

febbraio 17, 2009 Posted by | - R. Dinosauri, 1, 3 Triassico, America Southern, Articolo sc. di riferimento, Bl - Top posts, Blogs, FREE ACCESS, Lang. - Italiano, Mesozoic, P - Evoluzione, P - Ritrovamenti fossili, Paleontology / Paleontologia, Theropoda | , , , , , , , | Lascia un commento

2009-02-05 – Maiacetus inuus (Archaeoceti) e l’origine delle balene (whales origin)

Antiche balene di terra

Scoperti fossili di un antenato delle odierne balene che conduceva parte della vita in terra e parte in acqua

Due nuovi fossili di antiche balene – una femmina gravida e un maschio – gettano luce sul modo in cui gli antenati di questi giganteschi mammiferi sono passati da una vita terricola a quella acquatica.

I fossili risalgono a 47,5 milioni di anni fa e sono stati scoperti in Pakistan fra il 2000 e il 2004 per essere quindi studiati da paleontologi dell’Università del Michigan, che ora illustrano i loro risultati in un articolo pubblicato sulla rivista on line PloS.

Rispetto agli altri fossili di balena, quelli esaminati da Philip Gingerich e collaboratori – appartenenti alla specie Maiacetus inuus, facente parte del gruppo degli Archaeoceti – occupano una posizione intermedia sul cammino evolutivo che le ha portate a passare dall’essere animali completamente terricoli a marini.

L’eccezionalità del ritrovamento è dovuto anche al fatto che è la prima volta che si trova lo scheletro completo del feto di uno di questi animali. Il feto è posizionato in posizione cefalica, come i mammiferi terrestri e a differenza delle attuali balene, e ciò indica – osservano i ricercatori – che queste antiche balene partorivano sulla terraferma e non in mare. Un altro indizio dello stile di vita terricolo di questi animali è dato dal gruppo di denti ben sviluppati chiaramente individuabili nel fossile del feto, che indicano la capacità del piccolo di iniziare ad alimentarsi da solo.

Maiacetus aveva quattro zampe modificate in modo da poter nuotare abbastanza agevolmente. Peraltro, per quanto i loro arti modificati fossero in grado di sopportare il peso del corpo anche sulla terra, con molta probabilità non mettevano in grado l’animale di percorrere distanze di una certa entità. “Chiaramente vivevano nella zona compresa fra l’acqua e la terra andando su e giù”, ha osservato Gingerich.

Da altri indizi anatomici, fra cui la differenza di lunghezza dei canini fra maschio e femmina, i ricercatori hanno anche potuto ipotizzare, sulla scorta di un raffronto con i comportamenti delle diverse specie attualmente viventi, che i maschi non avessero una comportamento territoriale né che fossero a capo di un branco di femmine.  (gg)

http://lescienze.espresso.repubblica.it/articolo/Antiche_balene_di_terra/1334701

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Pregnant fossil shows how early whales evolved

Wed Feb 4, 2009 1:33am GMT

CHICAGO (Reuters) – Fossils from two early whales — a male and a rare pregnant female — shed light on how these ancestors to modern whales made the leap from walking on land to ruling the sea.

 The fetal remains, found with the 47.5 million-year-old pregnant female, were positioned head down, suggesting these creatures gave birth on land, while spending much of the rest of their time in the water.

 Initially, the tiny fetal teeth stumped University of Michigan paleontologist Philip Gingerich, whose team discovered the fossils in Pakistan in 2000 and 2004.

 “When I first saw the small teeth in the field, I thought we were dealing with a small adult whale, but then we continued to expose the specimen and found ribs that seemed too large to go with those teeth,” Gingerich, whose study appears in the Public Library of Science journal PLoS ONE.

 The fetal skeleton is the first specimen of the extinct whale group known as Archaeoceti, and the find represents a new species named Maiacetus inuus, a hybrid of the words for “mother whale” and Inuus, the name of a Roman fertility god.

 The fetus was positioned head down like other land animals, allowing it to begin breathing right away. This suggests the group had not yet made the leap to giving birth in the water like modern whales, which are born tail first to allow them to start swimming right after birth.

 The 8.5-foot (2.59-meter) male, which was collected in the same fossil beds as the female, is about 12 percent bigger and had fangs that were 20 percent larger than those of the female. Gingerich said these well developed choppers suggest the creatures spent a large portion of their time catching and eating fish.

 Both fossils had four flipper-like legs that could have supported their weight on land, but only for short distances, suggesting these whales likely came on shore to mate, rest and give birth, Gingerich said.

 “They clearly were tied to shore,” Gingerich said. “They were living at the land-sea interface and going back and forth.”

He said the Maiacetus fossils appear to represent an intermediate whale form, showing the evolution from land-dwelling to aquatic creatures.

 The full study can be found here

 (Editing by Sandra Maler)

http://uk.reuters.com/article/scienceNewsMolt/idUKTRE5130CQ20090204?pageNumber=2&virtualBrandChannel=0

 


Science Centric

Pregnant fossil shows how early whales evolved
Reuters – 22 ore fa
The 8.5-foot (2.59-meter) male, which was collected in the same fossil beds as the female, is about 12 percent bigger and had fangs that were 20 percent larger than those of the female.
Fossil shows whales lived on land Times Online
Earliest whales gave birth on land Science News
National Geographic – ScienceBlogs – Discover Magazine – dBTechno
e altri 83 articoli simili »

febbraio 5, 2009 Posted by | - Mammiferi, An. Vertebrates, Articolo sc. di riferimento, Asia, Cenozoic, FREE ACCESS, Lang. - Italiano, P - Evoluzione, P - Ritrovamenti fossili, Paleontology / Paleontologia | , , , , , , , , | Lascia un commento

2009-01-28 – Triceratops in combattimento (Horning In on Triceratops)

In un nuovo articolo scientifico free access su PLOS descritte evidenze di combattimento per i Triceratopi

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January 28, 2009 in Archaeology & Paleontology

Horning In on Triceratops
In a study published in the journal PLoS ONE, researchers conjecture that the three horns of Triceratops were often used for fighting–because museum specimens show much more scarring than in the horns of a related species. Cynthia Graber reports

Triceratops, as the name suggests, were huge dinosaurs adorned with three horns on their heads. Scientists now say those horns may have been a sort of battle bludgeon. Andrew Farke is a curator at the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology in California. He became curious about that headgear. Farke and colleagues wanted to investigate whether Triceratops fought each other with their horns. Which posed a problem: obviously, we can’t go back in time to watch the animals interact. So the researchers resorted to some techniques out of a Cretaceous CSI.

They examined more than 400 museums specimens of Triceratops and another closely related one-horned dinosaur called Centrosaurus. They scanned the skulls for injuries around where Triceratops might have locked horns and wrestled. Their assumption was that if the horns were just for display, both species would show few scars.

But the Triceratops had 10 times more skull injuries than their Centrosaurus cousins. The most likely explanation is that they probably jabbed each other in the head while fighting. The researchers published their findings in the journal Public Library of Science ONE. They also caution that the horns could have served more than one purpose—perhaps fighting and flaunting.

—Cynthia Graber

http://www.sciam.com/podcast/episode.cfm?id=horning-in-on-triceratops-09-01-28

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Telegraph.co.uk

Raquel was right not to lock horns with Triceratops
Times Online – 9 ore fa
The three-horned dinosaur Triceratops used its spectacular headgear to charge and wrestle with other members of its species in a similar way to modern deer and antelope, according to research.
Triceratops tête à tête Nature.com (subscription)
Horning In On Triceratops Scientific American
The Press Association – FOXNews – Wired News – Science News
e altri 25 articoli simili »

In german:

 


Wissenschaft aktuell Nachrichtendienst

Triceratops benutzte Hörner als Waffen
Spiegel Online – 2 ore fa
Auch die These, die Dinosaurier hätten damit Fressfeinde wie den Tyrannosaurus rex abgewehrt, ist verbreitet – ebenso wie die Annahme, Triceratops habe die Hörner im Kampf gegen Artgenossen benutzt und mit dem Nackenschild gegnerische Stöße abgewehrt.
Duell mit drei Hörnern wissenschaft.de
Nicht nur Zierde, sondern auch Waffe Wissenschaft aktuell Nachrichtendienst
Tagesspiegel – WELT ONLINE – derStandard.at
e altri 10 articoli simili »

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Scientific article:

Evidence of Combat in Triceratops

Andrew A. Farke, Ewan D. S. Wolff, Darren H. Tanke

Download: XMLPDFCitation

gennaio 28, 2009 Posted by | - Ceratopsidi, - Ornitopodi, - R. Dinosauri, 1 Cretaceo, America Northern, An. Vertebrates, Articolo sc. di riferimento, FREE ACCESS, Italiano (riassunto), Lang. - German, Mesozoic, P - Paleoetologia, Paleontology / Paleontologia, X - Riviste e Multimedia | , , , , , , , , | Lascia un commento

2009-01-16 – USA officially designated state dinosaurs

While it seemsdefinitive to change the name of Texas official state dinosaur from

take a look to other officially designated state dinosaurs:

  • Colorado: Stegosaurus
  • District of Columbia: Capitalsaurus
  • Maryland: Astrodon johnstoni
  • Missouri: Hypsibema missouriensis
  • New Jersey: Hadrosaurus foulkii
  • Wyoming: Triceratops

Abot Texas see also

gennaio 16, 2009 Posted by | - R. Dinosauri, 1 Cretaceo, America Northern, Articolo sc. di riferimento, Curiosità, FREE ACCESS, Mesozoic, Paleontology / Paleontologia | , , | Lascia un commento

2008-10-13 – Aerosteon Update 2 (Aerosteon riocoloradensis)

Un nuovo aggiornamento sui commenti dai Blog alla descrizione dell’Aerosteon riocoloradensis (e temi associati ….. ) e i multimedia da “La Repubblica” (fotogallery e video

Blog ITA – Theropoda + UltRazionale 

(complimenti ad Andrea Cau per gli splendidi post)

  • Perché i dati attuali inducono a ribattezzare il “sistema polmonare aviario” come “sistema polmonare saurischio” Ottobre 13, 2008
  • Il Gigantismo, espressione mesozoica del bauplan dinosauriano. Il caso dei teropodi. Ottobre 10, 2008
  • Il Giorno in cui Megamatrice superò la Massa Critica, raggiunse l’autocoscienza e si autoproclamò “Gregory Paul” Ottobre 10, 2008
  • Immagine in aggiunta al precedente post Ottobre 10, 2008
  • Errori di battitura o lapsus? Ottobre 9, 2008 [Da non perdere !!!!!]
  • Dà ad Aerosteon quel che è di Aerosteon, e a Majungasaurus quel che è di Majungasaurus Ottobre 9, 2008
  • Cos’è diagnostico per identificare un uccello? Dipende se lo dici oggi o se lo dici nel 1988… Ottobre 8, 2008
  • Perché il braccio di Tyrannosaurus non è atrofico come quello di Carnotaurus? Ottobre 6, 2008
  • Super Theropod Week, Part 3: Aerosteon e la ventilazione in Theropoda Ottobre 3, 2008
  • BLOG ENG – Tetrapod zoology

  • Unhappy with Aerosteon Ottobre 6, 2008
  •  Blog ENG – SVPOW

  • The Aerosteon saga, Part 2: Overinflation and undercitation Ottobre 5, 2008
  • The Aerosteon saga, Part 1: Introduction and background Ottobre 4, 2008
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    Original Article:

    Evidence for Avian Intrathoracic Air Sacs in a New Predatory Dinosaur from Argentina

    Paul C. Sereno, Ricardo N. Martinez, Jeffrey A. Wilson, David J. Varricchio, Oscar A. Alcober, Hans C. E. Larsson

    Background

    Living birds possess a unique heterogeneous pulmonary system composed of a rigid, dorsally-anchored lung and several compliant air sacs that operate as bellows, driving inspired air through the lung. Evidence from the fossil record for the origin and evolution of this system is extremely limited, because lungs do not fossilize and because the bellow-like air sacs in living birds only rarely penetrate (pneumatize) skeletal bone and thus leave a record of their presence.

    http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0003303

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  •  Non chiamatelo “sistema polmonare aviario”, ma “sistema polmonare saurischio” Ottobre 13, 2008
  • Il Gigantismo, espressione mesozoica del bauplan dinosauriano. Il caso dei teropodi. Ottobre 13, 2008
  • ottobre 13, 2008 Posted by | - R. Dinosauri, - Teropodi, 1 Cretaceo, America Northern, Articolo sc. di riferimento, FREE ACCESS, Lang. - Italiano, P - Ritrovamenti fossili, Paleontology / Paleontologia, Theropoda | , , , , , , , , , , | Lascia un commento

    2008-10-06 – Aerosteon Update (Aerosteon riocoloradensis)

    La recentissima descrizione del Aerosteon riocoloradensis ha dato luogo ad una lunga serie di commenti e di approfondimenti sul web.

    Ve ne segnalo alcuni che mi hanno positivamente impressionato per la chiarezza della spiegazione e/o per le interessanti considerazioni.

    Blog ITA – Theropoda

  • Perché il braccio di Tyrannosaurus non è atrofico come quello di Carnotaurus?
  • Super Theropod Week, Part 3: Aerosteon e la ventilazione in Theropoda
  •  Blog ENG – SVPOW

  • The Aerosteon saga, Part 2: Overinflation and undercitation Ottobre 5, 2008
  • The Aerosteon saga, Part 1: Introduction and background Ottobre 4, 2008
  • ————————————————————————————

    Evidence for Avian Intrathoracic Air Sacs in a New Predatory Dinosaur from Argentina

    Paul C. Sereno1*, Ricardo N. Martinez2, Jeffrey A. Wilson3, David J. Varricchio4, Oscar A. Alcober2, Hans C. E. Larsson5

    Abstract

    Background

    Living birds possess a unique heterogeneous pulmonary system composed of a rigid, dorsally-anchored lung and several compliant air sacs that operate as bellows, driving inspired air through the lung. Evidence from the fossil record for the origin and evolution of this system is extremely limited, because lungs do not fossilize and because the bellow-like air sacs in living birds only rarely penetrate (pneumatize) skeletal bone and thus leave a record of their presence.

    http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0003303

    ————————————————————————————-

    ottobre 6, 2008 Posted by | - R. Dinosauri, America Northern, Articolo sc. di riferimento, FREE ACCESS, Lang. - Italiano, P - Ritrovamenti fossili, Paleontology / Paleontologia | , , , , , , , , , | Lascia un commento

    Il dominio dei dinosauri è durato 50 milioni di anni (Dinosaur domination, Benton, Brusatte, Bristol)

    Dinosaur domination ‘took 50m years’

    Published Date: 01 October 2008

    DINOSAURS fought back from two mass extinctions and waited up to 50 million years to achieve world domination, new research has revealed.
    They originated 230 million years ago, and, in a study reported in the journal Biology Letters, Professor Michael Benton and Steve Brusatte from the University of Bristol say their domination was “a slow and complicated event”.
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    ottobre 1, 2008 Posted by | - R. Dinosauri, Articolo sc. di riferimento, Bl - Top posts, FREE ACCESS, Paleontology / Paleontologia | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Lascia un commento